ADHD in Adults – 10.5 things you should know. – 10.5 things that can help you move forward

 

Is ADHD the same as ADHD in kids? If so, then why are some adults not diagnosed until after they leave school?

If this is the case, then here are 10.5 things you can learn about ADHD.  Now, notice I changed my terminology from “should “to “what you can”.  In the first instance, I violated a personal rule when talking about ADHD in my capacity as an ADHD and EF coach.  To me, “Should “is a dirty word. The “S” word in fact.  “Can” is far more enlightening and much less associated with guilt. So, from now on, no more “shoulding”.

 

  1. ADHD is not just in kids, not just in boys- many adults are quite shocked when they are finally diagnosed, particularly women.( See our website for our thoughts on this http://www.connectadhd.com/uncategorized/adhd-is-just-in-kidsright/)
  2. Find a practitioner who actually knows about ADHD, sees ADHD clients and actively keeps up to date with the condition. If you practitioner says “it’s not ADHD, your too old” head out the door and don’t look back, move forward. Refer them to our website.
  3. Be heard, it is your experience. Talk to someone who knows and understands the condition. If those around you don’t understand, know that your experience and feelings are real, not just an “ADHD moment”. Once we understand the reason, we can do something about it. Once they understand, they can hopefully understand  you better.
  4. Be proud of your strengths, people with ADHD are frequently highly creative, fun to be with, often stand out from the crowd (think Will.I.am,  Brittney Spears, Justin Timberlake, Emma Watson ,Michael Phelps, Lisa Ling (U.S. reporter)  well known to be ADHD and public about it.
  5. Use supports systems and strategies that address what challenges you (notice I didn’t say “weakness” – another dirty word in my ADHD dictionary). If you had poor vision, you would get glasses…if you have ADHD there are accommodations that can help.
  6. ADHD Coaching can change your current habits and be a turning point to move forwards. If there is ADHD or executive function (EF) challenges, ensure you get help from a coach that has been trained specifically in ADHD coaching. Ask for where your ADHD coach has trained. It should be an academy/institution associated with the ICF (International Coach Federation) or PAAC (Professional ADHD Coach) association.  Find someone you like and trust. Someone that not only hears what you say, but listens also.
  7. Mindfulness– too much to say, contact us and we can explain!
  8. Stay positive- you may have had your fair share of negative feedback in the past. It might still be happening. People with ADHD are often “people-pleasers” for this very reason. They may crave positive feedback. Finding your strengths (and dusting them off, and giving them a polish if they have been buried for a while) will give you the very tools you need to move forward in a positive way. As I tell my clients, “whatever has happened in the past is just good information” …it’s true.
  9. Be advised by your doctor if medication is right for you. Dopamine availability is a key factor in the treatment of ADHD. Do not be afraid. Be careful. Be informed. Be open. Don’t be scared by misinformation.  If you were diabetic, you might need insulin.  If you are ADHD, you may well need medications.  There are stimulants AND non-stimulant treatment available. It’s all about balance.
  10. And 10.5- This one is so big, it’s the 1.5. You are the most important person in your life. Without you, you have nothing. If you are newly diagnosed or an adult with a history of ADHD (and told you had grown out of it) then heed this message.  The world of ADHD is a different world now.  You don’t have to hide, be ashamed or be shy about it.  There is help there, but better than that, understanding now. There are “Nay- sayers “about ADHD, their problem is their ignorance.Find your community. Coming soon in 2017 we are starting a Facebook community called Connect  ADHD .

We have relaunched our website! Leave a comment on this post.  What do you think? What is your experience with ADHD? Did you like this post and was it helpful? Do you have anything to ADD (!)   Let me know.